connected_globe_01In the first part of this article,we discussed some of the ways to reduce the load time of your web pages so you page displays faster to the viewer, keeping them engaged and gets better rankings from Google based on speedy delivery.

A Conversation Between Your Browser and the Web Server

Combining CSS & JS Files
By combining multiple CSS files, you can reduce the number of HTTP requests, speeding your page rendering. When a viewer opens your page, the browser on their machine sends a (n HTTP) request to the server, saying “Send me that page.”
Server: “Ok. Here.”
Browser: “Oh! And that Cascading Style Sheet that goes with it.”
optimizing graphics and code for faster pagesServer: “Ok. Here.”
Browser: “And that one.”
Server: “Ok. Here.”
Browser: “And that one.”
Server: “Ok. Here.”
Browser: “And that JavaScript file.”
Server: “Ok. Here.”
Browser: “And that one.”
Server: “Ok. Here.”
Browser: “And that one.”
Server: “Ok. Here.”
And so on.
You get the idea. A single page could require dozens, even hundreds of images, JavaScript files, Cascading Style Sheets (Blogs are notorious for using dozens of these), and even videos being requested by the browser from the server. And while these requests are lightning fast and take but a fraction of a second, they add up quick.

By intelligently combining certain CSS and JS files, you can reduce the number of requests back and forth to and from your server, reducing the load time of your page.


Enable Expires Headers – In your .htaccess file (used to control a certain accessibility to your web site files), you can add lines of code that will tell your pages and various file formats when to expire (or more importantly, when the browser and server need to supply new ones.) By keeping these files in the memory of your computer (or its “cache”), your browser doesn’t have to reload these from the server, speeding your page. A good web developer will know which files are more frequently updated and set the reloads on those appropriately.


Use Multiple Servers – Cheap!

Parallel File Servers – Web sites are “throttled”, or slowed down intentionally, by the number of servers that deliver objects (images and files, for instance). In the old days, a web page might have dozens of objects. Now, it can have hundreds.

By utilizing multiple sub-domains to deliver your files, your web site can be receiving images and files simultaneously, making it faster. To make it even more complicated, the sub-domains your site is pulling files from, don’t actually have to be on a different server. They can be pointed to a sub directory on your original server, but the web browser is fooled into thinking it’s coming from some where else, so it renders the page faster with simultaneous files.


To be continued…



Our Marketing Group, SEO, email marketing, PPC strategiesIf you need help reducing the load times of your page for both your prospective customers viewing the site and to help get better rankings from Google, please contact Metheney Consulting or Our Marketing Group at or email us at .